Tim McGraw Music Video

Tim McGraw – Humble And Kind (Official Video)

Samuel Timothy “Tim” McGraw (born May 1, 1967) is an American singer, songwriter and actor. He has been married to singer Faith Hill since 1996, and is the son of the late baseball player Tug McGraw.

McGraw has released fourteen studio albums (eleven for Curb Records and three for Big Machine Records). 10 of those albums have reached number 1 on the Top Country Albums charts, with his 1994 breakthrough album Not a Moment Too Soon being the top country album of 1994. All of these albums have produced 65 singles, 25 of which have reached number 1 on the Hot Country Songs or Country Airplay charts. Three of these singles — “It’s Your Love“, “Just to See You Smile“, and “Live Like You Were Dying” — were the top country songs of 1997, 1998, and 2004 according to Billboard Year-End. He has also won three Grammy Awards, 14 Academy of Country Music awards, 11 Country Music Association (CMA) awards, 10 American Music Awards, and three People’s Choice Awards. His Soul2Soul II Tour with Faith Hill is the highest grossing tour in country music history, and one of the top 5 among all genres of music.[1]

McGraw has ventured into acting, with supporting roles in The Blind Side (with Sandra Bullock), Friday Night Lights, The Kingdom, Tomorrowland, and Four Christmases (with Vince Vaughn and Reese Witherspoon), and lead roles in Flicka (2006) and Country Strong (2010). He was a minority owner of the Arena Football League‘s Nashville Kats.

In acknowledgement of his grandfather’s Italian heritage, McGraw was honored by the National Italian American Foundation (NIAF) in 2004, receiving the NIAF Special Achievement Award in Music during the Foundation’s 29th Anniversary Gala.

Dierks Bentley – Somewhere On A Beach “country music news

Seven albums into one of country music’s most-respected and most-unpredictable careers, award-winning singer/songwriter Dierks Bentley continues to grow. His latest evolution comes in the form of RISER, a project due early 2014 that stands as his most personal to date.

Written and recorded in the year following his father’s death, the album draws its title from “I’m A Riser,” a song about resilience and determination. “I’m A Riser” works as a commentary on spiritual, personal and societal recommitment, but it also applies to the competitive battlefield of the music industry. It’s particularly appropriate for an album about rejuvenation delivered by Bentley.

“Life in general has a way of knocking you down,” Bentley says. “It’s different reasons for different folks – could be personal reasons, could be family reasons, your job, drugs, alcohol. That song really applies to anybody that’s lived. There have always been those moments when we have to get back up and get on our feet. They are defining moments…breakthrough moments.”

Accepting change – and growing from it – is a key theme in RISER, and it’s reflected by the tone of the album, which demonstrates a new artistic depth and an extralevel of intensity for Bentley. It evolves from track to track, exuding a range of emotions, all the while impressing upon the listener that Bentley’s instinct for a hit is stronger than ever. Bentley made significant reconfigurations in his creative team to shake up his sonic texture without sacrificing his commercial drive. He re-enlisted executive producer Arturo Buenahora Jr., who worked on Bentley’s first two albums; and utilized producer Ross Copperman, who co-wrote “Tip It On Back” for Bentley’s current album Home.

The new atmosphere yielded the most focused and intense vocals of Bentley’s career. Some were recorded live with the band as the musicians laid down the tracks, but others were captured in less-than-obvious locales. One track’s vocal was recorded on Bentley’s tour bus. Still others were cut at Copperman’s house with the producer literally at Bentley’s side, pushing him to some of his most emotional, and seasoned, performances.

“It’s not even really a studio,” Bentley says of Copperman’s set-up. “It’s just kind of a corner of the house he’s taken over, so there was a kind of intimacy to the vocal process. It was important to get out of the studio and sing in different places, and to do it with other people in the room. That way, you have an audience and you get a sense of what’s working, what’s not working, when it’s feeling good, not feeling good. It brings a little more emotion and energy out of your voice.”

Since making a life-altering drive with his father from Phoenix to Nashville when he was 19 years old, Bentley has forged his own path in an industry built predominantly on formula. He has mixed elements of modern country, classic country, bluegrass and rock, maintaining an unmistakable identity while constantly reinventing his sound. His album Home debuted at No. 1 and spawned three consecutive chart-topping hits, marking 12 career No. 1 songs for Bentley as a singer and songwriter. His five previous studio albums have sold more than five million copies, garnered 11 GRAMMY nominations and earned him an invitation to join the Grand Ole Opry.

– See more at: http://www.dierks.com/bio#sthash.roC9B6lu.dpuf

Luke Bryan – Strip It Down Country music news

Bio From —>http://www.billboard.com/artist/308556/luke-bryan/biography

Singer and songwriter Luke Bryan comes by his country influences naturally: he grew up in Leesburg, Georgia, a small town 100 miles from the Alabama border where his father grew peanuts and sold fertilizer for a living. Bryan helped his family work the farm when he was young, but in his early teens he developed a passion for country music, picking up his influences from his parents’ record collection, listening to the likes of George Strait, Conway Twitty, Ronnie Milsap, Alan Jackson, and Merle Haggard. When he was 14, his folks bought him his first guitar, and a year later his playing and singing were strong enough that he started sitting in with local bands at a club featuring live country music. At 16, Bryan starting writing songs with the help of a pair of local tunesmiths who had enjoyed some success in Nashville; he planned to head to Music City to try his luck after graduating from high school until his brother died in an auto accident. Wanting to offer emotional support to his family, Bryan opted to attend Georgia Southern University instead, though he didn’t give up music. He continued writing songs, formed a band, and was playing gigs on campus or at nearby watering holes most weekends while pursuing his studies. He recorded a self-released album, which he sold at shows during this period, but was reluctant to take the plunge and devote himself to music full-time until he returned home to work in the family business after receiving his degree. Bryan’s dad, confident of his son’s talent, made him an offer: he could either move to Nashville or be fired.
In the early fall of 2001, Bryan pulled up stakes and relocated to Nashville, where his heartfelt songs of country life earned him a contract with one of the city’s many publishing houses. In his free time, Bryan continued to perform at local clubs, and after an A&R man from Capitol Records saw him perform a set of his original material, he was given a record deal. Capitol released Bryan’s first widely distributed album, I’ll Stay Me, in the summer of 2007, following it with Doin’ My Thing in 2009. Doin’ My Thing peaked at number two on the country charts — and at number six on the Top 200 — and it spawned two number one singles: “Rain Is a Good Thing” and “Someone Else Calling You Baby” (while “Do I” hit number two). Bryan returned with his third album, Tailgates & Tanlines, in the summer of 2011, its release preceded by the single “Country Girl (Shake It for Me).” That song was the first of four Top Five country singles pulled from the album: “I Don’t Want This Night to End” and “Drunk on You” both hit number one, while “Kiss Tomorrow Goodbye” peaked at number three. This success kept Tailgates & Tanlines in the charts well into 2012, and Bryan supported the record with steady touring.
Early in 2013, Bryan compiled his four Spring Break-themed EPs since 2009 as the album Spring Break…Here to Party; it promptly became his first number one album on the pop charts. Bryan solidified his standing in country music by winning ACM’s prestigious Entertainer of the Year award in June. That August, he released his fourth studio album, Crash My Party, which hit number one on the country charts and the pop charts. Each of the first four singles from the album — the title track, “That’s My Kind of Night,” “Drink a Beer,” and “Play It Again” — steadily climbed to number one on the country charts during 2013 and 2014. Bryan chose to close out his series of Spring Break EPs in 2015 with the release of the aptly titled Spring Break…Checkin’ Out; the collection went to number one on the Billboard country charts and three on the Billboard 200. Next up was Bryan’s fifth full-length album, Kill the Lights, which appeared in 2015 as well. Another number one hit on the Billboard 200, it saw Bryan once again working with producer Jeff Stevens (Jody Stevens was also brought aboard as a co-producer), but unlike Crash My Party, the record saw a heavy dose of originals from Luke: he received writing credits on roughly half of the album’s 13 songs. ~ Mark Deming, Rovi

Brad Paisley – Country Nation- country music news

http://www.bradpaisley.com/story

Brad Paisley is a critically acclaimed singer, songwriter, guitarist and entertainer whose talents have earned him numerous awards, including three GRAMMYs, two American Music Awards, 14 Academy of Country Music Awards and 14 Country Music Association Awards (including Entertainer of the Year), among many others.

He has been a proud member of the Grand Ole Opry since 2001. Paisley has written or co-written 20 of his 23 #1 singles with the first being his 1999 hit “He Didn’t Have To Be” and his most recent, “Perfect Storm,” from his chart topping 2014 album Moonshine in the Trunk.

Paisley’s current single is “Crushin’ It” from the same album and Paisley will kicked off his Crushin’ It World Tour the middle of May by playing to over 50,000 fans. Paisley has recently partnered with Boot Barn® and developed an exclusive line of jeans, hats, T-shirts, jewelry, belts and woven shirts called Moonshine Spirit by Brad Paisley.

On a personal note, this guy is one of my all time favorite artists and entertainers, who deserves everything he has been given and much more.

I am looking forward to his next be country ballad for sure, it would also be so cool if he would let out that amazing vocal range he has more often.  He has one of the best pure male country voices in the world, but would sure love to here him rock out one of these days with his vocal chops, I know he could if he wanted to.

Carrie Underwood Bio Country music weekly news

Music is at its most powerful when it tells a story. Few things are more potent than a song that washes over the listener, each cinematic line surging with emotion and taking the audience on an unexpected journey. In the past decade, Carrie Underwood has emerged as one of the most compelling storytellers of her generation. Beyond the range and timbre of her impressive pipes, Underwood knows how to weave and deliver a delicious tale. Aptly titled Storyteller, Underwood’s fifth studio album is filled with intriguing characters and fascinating ruminations on life, death, love, and heartbreak.

“I feel like one of the things that sets country music apart from other types of music is the storytelling aspect,” the seven-time GRAMMY® winner says. “I want three-and-a-half-minute movies on the radio. I love that there’s a beginning, middle, and an end, and it all makes sense. You can follow the characters, and you can see it all playing out in your head. That’s what I’m drawn to, so that’s what I write, what I pick, and what I want to sing. All the songs on the album either are very character-driven mini-movies or they’re my own personal stories. Hopefully, both are entertaining and relatable.”

One of the most awarded singers in any genre of music, Underwood has built a stellar career on cinematic songs that pack an emotional wallop, from her first chart-topper “Jesus, Take the Wheel” to more recent No. 1 smashes such as “Blown Away,” “Two Black Cadillacs,” “Something in the Water,” and “Little Toy Guns.” Since winning American Idol in 2005, Underwood has sold 58 million records worldwide, scored 21 No. 1 hits (including 11 she co-wrote), and earned over 100 major awards. She was the first female artist to be twice named the Academy of Country Music’s Entertainer of the Year. A respected member of the Grand Ole Opry, Underwood has tallied 38 weeks at No. 1 on Billboard’s Top Country Albums chart with songs that have been streamed more than 1.5 billion times worldwide. In addition to her impressive recording career, Underwood branched out into acting with roles in film and television, including starring as Maria von Trapp in NBC’s Emmy®-winning The Sound of Music Live!, which attracted 44 million viewers. She has also launched her own fitness lifestyle line, CALIA by Carrie Underwood, which made a splash during New York Fashion Week 2015.

The Checotah, Oklahoma native’s four previous studio albums – Some Hearts, Carnival Ride, Play On, and Blown Away – have each been certified Platinum or multi-Platinum, and all have been named Country Album of the Year at the American Music Awards. In 2014, Underwood released her first hits collection, Greatest Hits: Decade #1. Storyteller has already continued that momentum with the record-breaking success of the hit first single, “Smoke Break.” “‘Smoke Break’ is all about the overworked, the tired, the people that just run to catch up,” Underwood says. “‘Smoke Break’ is about taking a step away for just a minute and being able to clear your head and collect your thoughts. We were very careful when we wrote it in wanting to make sure people understood the metaphor. That’s why we said, ‘I don’t smoke, but sometimes I need a smoke break. I don’t drink, but sometimes I need a stiff drink.’ It’s more about finding those things that take you away, whether that’s your coffee break or a glass of wine at night or your exercise or chatting with your mom. It’s that thing that is just for you, and it’s a release.”

From the small-town working mom and big-city ladder-climbing man she sings about in “Smoke Break” to the unsavory Bonnie and Clyde type couple in “Choctaw County Affair” and the spousal abuse survivor in “Church Bells,” Storyteller is populated with complex characters: an intentional effort by Underwood. “I naturally gravitate toward songs that have strong characters,” she says. “I don’t ever want to write a song or sing a song about a person that’s just there. That’s just not my style. And I feel like in the whole storytelling aspect, people are strongest when they’re pushed to their limits. When it’s do or die. Fight or flight. You’re either going to bend and come back stronger than ever, or you’re going to break. That’s why I pick songs like ‘Church Bells.’ This girl had to do something, or else she was going to pay the price. I just love songs about strong women. I love being sucked into that story: rooting for the woman and seeing that she does something powerful that she never thought she could do.”

Underwood describes the woman in “Church Bells” as “Fancy’s little sister,” referencing Reba’s iconic hit. “It’s just a cool story of a strong woman,” says Underwood of the song, which finds a poor but beautiful young girl married to an abusive, wealthy man. “In the song, she ends up killing him – which is not a new storyline for me – but again, it’s a movie in song form. The church bells do evolve. In the beginning, they represent a wedding. In the middle, they represent her needing some help after he abuses her, and at the end, the church bells represent the ones that ring out at his funeral, and she’s free. So a lot happens in three-and-a-half minutes.”

The woman in the album’s picturesque opener, “Renegade Runaway,” owes a lot to the women of the West. “She is dangerous. She’s wild. It’s not like she’s evil. She just can’t be tamed. She doesn’t need anybody to complete her,” Underwood explains. “The song has this great western Young Guns feel to it. When Hillary Lindsey, Chris DeStefano, and I were writing ‘Renegade Runaway,’ we were Googling all these belles of the Wild West. We were looking up pictures of these strong women standing there in their corsets and lace, and they had their guns on their hips. There were all of these incredible images and stories we were learning about these really strong women, and we were incorporating them into this character.”

Though the characters Underwood and her co-writers created drive a lot of action on Storyteller, the most poignant songs are those snapshots of her own life, including the tender ballad “Heartbeat.” “My husband and I are so lucky to be able to go to so many events and things,” she says. “We live our lives in the public and around people, but I’m the kind of person that just wants to be alone with him and be one on one. I don’t typically do very many love songs, but when we were writing ‘Heartbeat,’ there was something so real about it. “We live in this crazy, loud world where so much stuff is flying at us. Sometimes we just need to get back to what’s simple and what’s real.”

Another very personal song is “The Girl You Think I Am.” She says, “This is me telling my story about my dad. This is Hillary Lindsey talking about her dad. And that was David Hodges using a lot of his experience being a dad to girls. All of our personal stories are injected into this song that I hope is super-relatable on every level to others.”

The song that reflects the biggest change in Underwood’s life in 2015 is the closing track, “What I Never Knew I Always Wanted,” a celebration of marriage and motherhood that explores her feelings about her husband and their son Isaiah. “‘What I Never Knew I Always Wanted’ is definitely my story,” says Underwood. “I was pregnant at the time when we wrote it. I was never the kind of person that wanted this huge family, but the second I found out I was pregnant, it was like, ‘Oh, my gosh! I did want this. Let’s write a song about it!’ And even with my husband, I was never the kind of person that wondered, ‘Where’s my Prince Charming?’ That wasn’t me at all. But then once I met him, and we started dating, I guess I realized I was wrong. And I could admit that. I could admit that I never planned this, but it happened, and I couldn’t imagine my life any other way. Stuff like that is extremely personal, but there’s going to be a lot of people out there that relate to this song. It’s my story, and I think it’s a lot of people’s story.”

In crafting her new album, Underwood worked for the first time with producers Jay Joyce (Little Big Town, Eric Church) and Zach Crowell (Sam Hunt, Keith Urban), as well as her longtime producer Mark Bright. “I want to grow, and I want to change, and I want my music to reflect that, and I felt like I just needed things to switch up a little bit in order to achieve that.

“I’m a very scheduled person,” she continues, “and I like knowing how things are going to happen and when they’re going to happen, which is why I also needed someone that was unpredictable to me. Jay Joyce is just an uber-creative guy. One time he literally had me singing through this voice box thing, like a bullhorn. It was just a different way of doing things. Zach Crowell was somebody that was new for me to work with, as well. I had written with him a little bit, and his name kind of started poppin’ up all over songs that I was choosing, so it just kind of made sense to work with him in a production sense. I’ve been working with Mark Bright for 10 years, and we are such a great team. I knew I wanted him to work on this album. All three producers allowed me to be me. Nobody ever tried to tell me to sing it like this or do it like this. I felt like that helped with the continuity of the album. We have an album with three producers, but with each, it was about bringing out the best for every song.”

In an already distinguished career, Storyteller feels like a landmark album. It’s a milestone felt by its creator. “The Storyteller album marks the beginning of a new chapter in every way in my life and my career,” Underwood says. “Musically, I feel like I’m stronger than I’ve ever been. I feel like I’m more confident in myself as an entertainer, as a songwriter, as a singer. I’ve definitely evolved, and it’s all been very organic. The album has some songs that are a little more gritty and edgy, and others that have an R&B feel to them. Then there are these other songs that are just twangy. We brought in a lot of different elements in a way that makes the album feel fresh and new. I hope people just call it good music.”https://www.carrieunderwoodofficial.com/bio/

FarmBorough Festival Canceled Country Music News

d1ac59a78fc8da7d788dd454efb1194bFarmBorough, music festival set for June 17th through 19th, has been canceled. This was to be the second year for the event, which launched in June 2015 at New York’s Randall’s Island Park. Jason Aldean, Tim McGraw and Toby Keith were tapped as headliners

A message on FarmBorough’s site explains the cancellation.

“FarmBorough Festival will not return to Randall’s Island in June of 2016. All of us at FarmBorough Festival appreciate the support we have received, but conditions dictate that we redirect our energy at this time,” reads the statement. “We appreciate the opportunity you afforded us to present FarmBorough in New York City, and apologize for any inconvenience.”

Refunds for the festival, along with pre-purchased ferry passes to reach Randall’s Island, will be available.

While the specific reason for the festival’s demise is unknown, it doesn’t appear to be any lingering physical issue with the venue: the rock and pop Governors Ball Music Festival is set for the same site June 3rd through 5th.

FarmBorough is just the latest country music gathering to be canceled. The Big Barrel Country Music Festival, scheduled for June in Delaware, was called off last month. It too was entering its second year.

By

country music weekly chats with Matt Austin country music news

matt austin

Hello Matt Austin, Before we get into all the amazing things you have going on right now, let’s start from the beginning!  you grew up in Detroit, Michigan , can you tell us what growing up there was like for you as a kid and was music a strong influence in your family? How did you come upon your interest to be a musician?

Well, I grew up in the Metro Detroit area, in a city called Woodhaven that is about 20 minutes south of Detroit.  It was cool growing up there,  it wasn’t a big city, but it wasn’t rural either and if you wanted find the country roads, we didn’t have to go very far. 

Music was a strong influence in my family.  My Dad played guitar as a hobby and really loved music.  My mom was the singer though.  My Dad gave singing a good effort but it was my mom that had the voice. 

Then my Uncle Gary moved in with us when I was 9 years old and he showed me this Stevie Ray Vaughan album, “Texas Flood,” and I was hooked, by the sounds and asked my parents for a guitar for Christmas. 

They got me one that Christmas and everything started when I was 10 years old!

2)  You have a fascinating list of musicians that have influenced your path in music. Artists like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Lynard Skynard, Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. Such a variety of styles of music! you can definitely hear the rock roots in your music , what was it about these artists that captivated your interest to follow their direction in music?

I have to give credit here to my Dad again.  We would rock out these artists when I was growing up.  I think Country Music now has a lot of these influences in it today!

I will also add to that and say with such an influence of these Rock Icons in your music , it’s no wonder you have such a rich, solid sound that is all your own!

3) What some people may not know is that your actually the frontman for a rock band The Paper Street Saints in your early performing years,  opening in Detroit area for such heavyweight acts such as Bon Jovi , Def Leppard, Styx and Tesla! those are some pretty great bands to share the stage with! What was it like to perform with these artists? you must have some memorable moments to share with us of those times.

Well, I wasn’t the front man in this band.  I was the lead guitar player and I sang backing vocals.  It wasn’t until after I left this band that I started to develop my own solo career as an artist.

When I opened for Bon Jovi it was at The Palace in Auburn Hills MI with Paper Street Saints and it was incredible to look out to 20,000 fans while we were playing.  My Dad roadied for us when we were eating in the catering room, I nearly spilled my drink all over the table when Bon Jovi walked in the room. 

When I opened for Def Leppard and Styx I was with the Matt Austin Band and this was at DTE Energy Music Theatre, formally know as Pine Knob.

This was another incredible moment for me to step on that stage to perform.  My Dad used to take me to concerts here and I always wanted to perform on that stage!

4) It’s hard to imagine a hard rocker as you listen to your current playlist today, what were you doing the day the emerging new country sound caught your ear and you made the decision to turn the dial to country? This direction has proven to be highly successful transition for Canadian Country artist Dallas Smith, who has found tremendous success as a country artist .

I actually had taken a little break from the music business and was going to college for a Nursing Degree and my wife had seen Brantley Gilbert’s music video on CMT.  She woke me up and told me that she thought I would be good at this type of music.  I started posting some covers of me and an acoustic on YouTube and ended up getting a better response than I had ever had and it felt more natural to me than anything I’ve ever done. 

5)  Your music reflects feel good lyrics and catchy – crank up the volume – and thinking of your favorite memory kind of songs, are these drawn from your own personal experiences? what do you like to do when your not performing?

Some of my songs that I’ve written do reflect on my own personal experiences, and some of my songs are from songwriters out of Nashville.

It’s all about the song for me.

I was an athlete before I got in to music, so I love to try and keep my youth and stay in shape by working out, and playing basketball.  I love to watch football and movies as well.

6) How does a lyric typically trigger an idea for a song? Where does the inspiration usually hit you?

There is really no specific answer for this.  Song lyrics and inspirations have come from all different angles.  It could be something I see on a TV show or a movie, or something a friend is doing or dealing with, or something in my life. 

7) What can you tell any new listeners what to expect from one of your shows? From what I see you are definitely in your element onstage , the energy from you and your band is very infectious and the fans are truly having a great time!

Haha.  Yup.  You pretty much explained it all in a nut shell there.  It’s hard to explain, but when we get on the stage we lay it all out on the table.  There is definitely an energy in the room and the crowd can feel it too!

We just want everyone to feel good and have a great time while we are performing.  More than just being a good singer, and have great songs, being able to perform and entertain is a key element to all of this!

8)Tell us some of the great Country acts you have worked with or shared the stage with in the past or upcoming shows

We have been super fortunate over the last couple of years to be able to share the stage with Lee Brice, Sam Hunt, Chase Rice, Brantley Gilbert and many more, including performing at some of the largest country music festivals with artist’s like Cole Swindell, Parmalee, Florida Georgia Line, Luke Bryan and more!

We are currently working on tour dates for 2016 to support the our sophomore single at national country radio.  Hopefully fans will be able to catch us out on the road with one of these artist’s!

9) What is your favorite song to perform live at your concerts? one of my favorites is Cold One Tonight, such a great tune! but your whole playlist is fantastic!

Awe thanks so much!  Ya, that’s a fun one!  It’s funny because when we perform that song, even people who haven’t heard it before are singing the tag line by the end of it.  I’m not sure if I have a favorite one though.  I love them all in a different way.

10) You had a pretty exciting 2015 with your recent signing with Arrow Entertainment of Nashville/Seattle and a new EP being released, what were some other highlights of the year for you

2015 we have ended with a bang.  We released our debut single, “Summer I’ll Always Remember,’ to country radio and it just hit #9 on the New Music Weekly Country Main Chart and close to 60 radio stations across the country have added it to rotation.  We are super excited to release our next single, “Bad Feelin,” to country radio in January!

11) Your brand new EP “The Island presale is now going on with some cool insentives when you purchase , Tell us a little more about that and when the album officially becomes available  in digital stores,

Ya, this is pretty cool.  So the pre-release is available now on iTunes and Google Play for just $3.99 and you will get 3 songs instantly.  The EP then comes out on Christmas Day, and you will get the remaining 4 songs automatically on Christmas Day!  The first 250 people to get the presale and post a screen shot on social media with the hash tag #TheIslandEP get an autographed copy of my debut self-titled EP and they are entered for a chance to win a personal skype acoustic performance from me! 

12)  From The Island album has already released two great singles, ” The Island” and “Summer I’ll always Remember” give us a hint of what we will find when listening to the rest of the album?

For me, the hardest thing to do with this album was to pick which songs we would release as singles.  Honestly, they are all so good.  If you like the singles we release from it, don’t be surprised if you like the other songs on the EP even better.  They literally could all be singles. 

Well thanks Matt for taking the time to chat with us! We wish you and your family a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from us here at Country Music Weekly!

Matt Austin Photo

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Thank you so much for chatting with me!  We wish you and all your families at Country Music Weekly a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year as well!  

https://www.facebook.com/officialmattaustin

https://twitter.com/MattAustinMusic

Check out bad feeling by matt austin

country news Thomas Rhett still holding the number one spot on the Billboards Country charts.

Country Music News

Thomas Rhett is staying on top of the charts with “Die a happy man” This is a fantastic easy listening country song that just feels good.  Its great to see such a nice song ruling the top of the charts. Country needs a few more songs like this, and a few less whiskey drinking lets get drunk songs, not that we do not need those from time to time of course:)   Everybody loves a good easy going song from time to time, whether they will admit it or not. Die a happy man for sure delivers that good old country feeling.

Check out the Billboard country charts below.

http://www.billboard.com/charts/country-songs

country music news

Thomas Rhett photo

country music weekly news

country weekly charts check out Billboards top songs of 2015 via youtube.

Billboard charts country music news

http://www.billboard.com/charts/country-songs

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Thought we would share this cool you tube video play list, that gives the run down of the Billboard top Country songs of 2015.  So many awesome songs and videos here from some of Country Musics best of the best.  We look forward to sharing many great websites and destinations that speak country music to us all.

 

Country music news Blake Shelton is on top of the world.

Blake-Shelton-large

(Content from Official Blake Shelton Website)

Blake Shelton is many things. He is the hugely popular coach on the top-rated television music competition show The Voice, where singers he’s mentored have won three of six seasons. He is the reigning CMA Male Vocalist of the Year. He’s the charismatic live entertainer performing to packed houses in arenas, amphitheaters and stadiums across the country.

But the one overriding facet of who Blake Shelton is led him down a path that made all these other designations possible. Blake Shelton is a Country. Music. Singer.

Shelton is in a league of his own among contemporary country artists as a top-shelf interpreter of true country music songs, and Shelton’s 11th studio album, BRINGING BACK THE SUNSHINE, marks a return to showcasing that talent with an album that sonically represents the best contemporary country has to offer, yet feels like the classic cuts served up by the heroes that inspired Shelton as young boy in Ada., Oklahoma some 30 years ago. It’s a journey that includes a CMA Entertainer of the Year trophy, three RIAA certified Platinum albums, five RIAA certified Gold albums, 17 total No. 1 country singles,7.6 million albums and 22.8 million singles sold, and a four-year run as reigning CMA Male Vocalist of the Year.

On BRINGING BACK THE SUNSHINE, producer Scott Hendricks, Shelton’s longtime friend and collaborator, created an album that highlights what is arguably the most powerful vocals Blake Shelton has ever recorded. “If there’s one thing that is important to me, no matter what, it’s singing,” says Shelton. “I’m a fan of a lot of artists, but I always gravitate to the singers, and that’s why I always looked up to Earl Thomas Conley, Travis Tritt, Ronnie Milsap, Conway Twitty. These guys never went through the motions when it came to laying down a vocal.”

“That’s my job, to be the best singer I can be when I get in the studio,” says Shelton. “I don’t ever want someone to hear me on the radio and say ‘yeah, he’s singing okay, but where’s the heart?’ I want it all to be in there.”

From soaring confessionals and convincing professions of love and loss in cuts like the steel-drenched nostalgia of “Good Country Song,” the yearning “Sangria,” and the vulnerability of “Anyone Else,” to immediately memorable up- and mid-tempos such as the hilarious “Buzzin’,” innocent romanticism of “Gonna” and the Southern rock/country blend of the title cut, SUNSHINE is an album of highlights, and the exact tonic country music needs right now.

In short, SUNSHINE is a sterling example of what contemporary country music can be at its best, unfettered by outside influences and trends. “Our goal every time is to make the best record we can possibly make, and not let any politics or anything else get in the way of that,” says Shelton. “It’s me coming in and trying to be the best singer I can be, and Scott pushing me to do that, along with all the other jobs he has of making a record.”

Thirteen years since his first single “Austin” hit the top of the country radio charts, Shelton now holds 17 No. 1 singles to his credit, recently breaking his own record for most consecutive No. 1s at country radio. With 12 singles, including five from his last album alone, Shelton has the most No. 1s in a row on the country radio charts by any artist.

That unprecedented hot streak seems destined to continue on SUNSHINE, a recording process that begins with Shelton’s and Hendricks’ never-ending search for the perfect songs for Shelton’s supple baritone and demanding lyrical standards. “The only thing I really knew I wanted to do for sure—and Scott agreed—was, ‘let’s make a ‘country-er’ record than we’ve made in a while,” Shelton says, “and I do think we accomplished that. It definitely has elements of things you hear on the radio now, but I think it’s more of a throwback to some of those earlier albums I made with [producer] Bobby Braddock, as far as the lyrical content and even the melodies.”

 

The public’s first taste of that focus was ‘Neon Light,” which Shelton describes as owning a “straight up George Strait, George Jones or Conway Twitty sounding chorus, mixed with the more recent stuff that I have recorded.” Thematically, the always-confident Shelton knew what he wanted. “One of the things I felt like I should do as a country singer was record music again that’s about breakin’ up, and heartache, and going and getting drunk,” he says. “The last two albums I made, one was just before I got married and one was just after I got married. I was in a really good place, and still am. But, at some point, I feel a responsibility to get back to, honestly, some of the more stereotypical things about country music. Those were the things that drew me to country music, so I wanted to sing about going to a bar, or somebody breaking your heart, singin’ about girls and things. More classic country music topics, you know?”

 

But even with the familiarity SUNSHINE evokes, the album often surprises, as with the keenly insightful “Anyone Else,” a song few artists would have had the courage to cut. Shelton says he “stole” that song from his wife. “She was going to record that for her Platinum album,” Shelton reveals with a laugh. “I absolutely fell in love with that song, and I begged her for it. She owed me one anyway from ‘House That Built Me,’ so I quilted her on that to get the song I wanted.”

 

Indeed, it’s hard to imagine anyone else singing “Anyone Else,” a song of rare emotional nakedness to which Shelton brings a startling intensity. Shelton says it starts with the song, written by Luke Laird, Barry Dean and Natalie Hemby. With its gentle opening guitar notes, what first appears to be a chiming, easy-rolling ballad reveals itself with striking lyrics like  “a jealous sky won’t share the sun,” resulting in one of the most powerful songs Shelton has ever laid down.

 

“’Anyone Else’ is unlike anything else I’ve ever heard before,” Shelton says. “I can’t even tell you how much I love that song, I think it’s one of the most important songs I’ve ever recorded. I’ve been the guy on both sides of that song. I’ve been the guy that’s been jealous and hard on somebody, and not even know why, and I’ve also been the victim of that. The song is so relatable, and it’s so sad. Every time I sing it, there’s a different person that comes to mind that I’m singing it about, but it always includes me. But it hurts when people are hard on you, jealous or insecure, and won’t allow you to just be. I’ve experienced more of that in the last few years of my life than I have the other 38 years all put together. And when I can find a song that I can dump all those thoughts and emotions into, it’s a real big deal to me.”

 

More treasures abound on BRINGING BACK THE SUNSHINE, often filtered through the astute ears of Shelton’s in-house sample group, Miranda Lambert. “After I get some things I’m pumped about, I like to get Miranda in the truck and just play her stuff,” says Shelton. “When she heard ‘South Of Heaven,’ she played it again and again, and I called Scott and said, ‘man, we’re cuttin’ ‘South Of Heaven.’ Once we cut it, it became clear that this was one of my favorite ballads I’ve ever recorded.”

 

“South Of Heaven” is one of three vastly different tracks on SUNSHINE co-written by Wiseman. “The way Craig Wiseman can write a song blows my mind,” Shelton marvels. “He can not only put you in that moment, but in that person’s brain and what they’re feeling. [‘South Of Heaven’] definitely takes me back to high school, or even a little after high school, those moments that just seem magical, whenever you had that girl and you went back-roadin’, or whatever your particular version is—we all have a version of it—that song definitely takes me there.”

 

Conversely, another Wiseman gem, “Buzzin’” conjures up a different feeling entirely. “What I love about Craig, and I think ‘Buzzin’’ is a good representation of this, he’s so brilliant, so smart with his songwriting. “These songs are so genius and yet still so goofy at the same damn time. Every time I see his name on a song I can’t wait to hear it.”

 

Shifting gears yet again, Shelton believes “Sangria” is “one of the sexiest songs I’ve ever cut,” he says. “It sounds like something that came from a different time, almost like something Chris Isaak would have had on one of his records at some point. It’s just about one of those nights where you drink too much and you’re gonna end up hookin’ up with this person, it’s just inevitable. It’s not too over the top, but it’s pure sex, that’s the only way I know to describe that song.”

 

“Lonely Tonight,” a stirring duet with Ashley Monroe, was the “toughest vocal on the record for me,” Shelton says. “That song is just so range-y and, on top of that, I knew Ashley was going to come in and sing on it, and I knew that people were gonna hear her singing in a way they’d never heard her sing before,” he says. “We all know she’s a singer/songwriter, and we’ve all heard that side of her, but I don’t think people know the girl can wail like she can. I just wanted to step up to that level, so I was really hard on myself, and tried to make that as best as I could possibly get it.”

 

Others came more easily, like “I Need My Girl.” “That’s right in my wheelhouse of what I do, along the lines of ‘She Wouldn’t Be Gone’ or ‘Over You,’ some of those type of records that are kind of a power ballad,” Shelton says. “That’s my natural go-to, and that was fun for me to sing.”

 

While Shelton is about as stone country as a singer can get, he is deeply immersed in all sorts of music due to his other gig on The Voice (the seventh season began Sept. 22), a dynamic that inevitably infuses those influences into his own work. “Anything that you take in is gonna come back out in some way, and it has been doing that, for sure,” he says. Reflecting on that thought, Shelton adds, “I’m a country singer, and there’s nothing I’ll ever be able to do about that, or want to do about it. When I open my mouth, it’s country, and always has been. I just wanted to embrace that, embrace exactly who I am, to make this record. If somebody wants to get the gist of who I am from start to finish, I think this album musically encompasses all the roads I’ve explored as an artist.”

 

With its spirit of optimism, the song made perfect sense to Shelton as the title for the album. “I love the message of the song. It’s about a couple that’s gone through something, probably separated, and just decided to get back together, what’s most important is their love,” Shelton explains. “There’s something magical about that title, and given what this album is all about, I thought ‘BRINGING BACK THE SUNSHINE’ is like I’m bringing back some country music, some of these sounds we don’t hear that much anymore in country, at least in the mainstream,” he says. “Country is sunshine to me.”

 

Perhaps the defining track on SUNSHINE is “A Good Country Song,” a bittersweet, breathtaking slice of nostalgia written by Tommy Lee James, Matt Jenkins, and Jessi Alexander. “Jessi Alexander is a great friend of mine, and she got in touch with me when she heard we were cutting tracks and said, ‘I heard you’re recording, can I start writing for your project?’” Shelton says. “I said, ‘hell yeah.’ She’s written some very important songs in my career, like ‘Drink On It,‘ she co-wrote ‘Might Only Be You.’ When she writes for me, she literally writes for me, and if you ever question that, you only need listen to the lyric of ‘A Good Country Song.’ When I heard the lyric, it was almost as if she grew up in the same house I grew up in, from shifting the gears in my dad’s truck to listening to Earl Thomas Conley on a station out of Tulsa. There has never been a more accurate song about me that I have recorded.”

That’s it, in a nutshell. BRINGING BACK THE SUNSHINE showcases the many facets of a complicated person with a simple mission: creating a diverse, powerful country music album.

 

SUNSHINE taps into Shelton’s innate vocal rhythm, resulting in songs that are more pulsing than pounding, tempo notwithstanding. “It’s an accident, but it’s still by design of trying to keep the pulse up a little bit,” Shelton says, “while not getting too boring, because I do tend to be a ballad singer.”

 

So even if SUNSHINE finds Shelton entering a new phase of his career, the record still finds simultaneously him looking back and forward, in tone if not overall musicality. He’s still that guy who forfeited high school athletics to play gigs, who obsessed over the liners of each new country album he bought, who took off for Nashville at 17 armed with nothing but a dream and a country voice for the ages.

 

“It’s very important to me to push myself and push boundaries, musically and artistically, and always be looking for what’s next,” he says. “But it’s also important for me to come back and touch home base every once in a while, to be sure there’s always a firm foot planted in country music. Country’s defined a lot of different ways by a lot of different people, and I’m sure there are other people out there that will listen to ‘A Good Country Song’ and say ‘aw, that ain’t country.’ But country’s defined by each individual, and this is my definition of stepping back a little bit, let’s make a record that represents the beginning of my career, but also blending with where I’ve ended up. I think there’s still a place for that in country radio, and it’s important as an industry that we all don’t get too far away from home.”

 

This past summer, Shelton has been away from home performing before hordes of fans who have turned out for sold-out shows at iconic venues like New York’s Madison Square Garden, LA’s Hollywood Bowl and Chicago’s Wrigley Field. Shelton is wrapping the biggest tour of his career, but finds getting face-to-face with fans rewarding on multiple levels. “It’s so exciting to look down and see a six year old girl singing the words to ‘Ol’ Red’ or ‘Austin,’ and then look over and see a 60 year-old woman singing ‘Boys ‘Round Here,’ singing ‘backwoods legit, don’t take no shit.’ I always said my ultimate goal is to have a career like George Strait, and although I haven’t done that—and nobody probably ever will—that is my goal. And to step out there and see that it’s going from one generation to another, that’s the most satisfying and exciting thing that any artist can accomplish.”

So if the more seasoned and savvy TV era Blake could tell the driven 17 year-old Blake that headed off to Nashville anything, “I’d tell him just to relax and stop worrying so much,” he says. “I knew the one thing that I wanted to do with my life was country music, it worried me to death. I was never one of those people who was like, ‘I’ll give it a shot for a while and then move on.’ It never was that for me, it was ‘how am I gonna get this done, how am I gonna get my foot in the door?’ Even after I had a hit or two, it was worry of ‘how can I keep this going?’ It wasn’t until the last three or four years that I finally started taking a deep breath and going, ‘man, I get to be a country singer, and it’s OK.’ I get to do it now. I don’t care at what level, as long as I get to be country singer,’ that’s all I ever wanted to do.”

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