Country Music News-Hottest Country Songs of the Moment 2016 (top radio summer hits/best country music playlist)

Rascal Flatts – I Like The Sound Of That

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Rascal Flatts

  • Since their musical debut in 2000, Rascal Flatts has over 22.5 million albums sold and over 28 million digital downloads and delivered 15 #1 singles to the top of the charts.

    Rascal Flatts is the most awarded Country group of the past decade, earning over 40 trophies from the ACAs, ACMs, AMAs, CMAs, People’s Choice Awards and more. As one of the hottest-selling acts on tour in any genre, they’ve sold over 7 million concert tickets, and counting.

    The journey began when Jay and Gary, from the Columbus, Ohio, area, and Joe Don, from Picher, Oklahoma, teamed up in a club in Nashville’s Printers Alley. “We knew right away we had something special,” says Jay, “even if we were the only ones who ever got to hear it.”
    They weren’t. They quickly earned a record deal and talent, drive, and great song selection did the rest. Their list of hits constitutes one of the great bodies of work in modern country music, with “These Days,” “Bless the Broken Road,” “What Hurts The Most,” “My Wish,” “Take Me There” and “Here Comes Goodbye” as just the tip of an ever-expanding iceberg. Their performances are state-of-the art, house-rocking extravaganzas, sold-out excursions into musical excitement that have included as opening acts some of this generation’s great artists, including Taylor Swift, Blake Shelton and Jason Aldean.

    Committed to giving back, they are known for their charitable work, which includes raising three million dollars for the Monroe Carell Jr. Children’s Hospital at Vanderbilt in Nashville. It’s something close to all of their hearts.

    “To give back when you’re in a position to give seems like a natural thing to do,” says Jay. “It’s our responsibility as three guys who’ve been very blessed.”

    As for the accolades, it may be Opry membership that feels best to them at present.

    “It’s one of our proudest moments in the world, being part of the Opry family,” says Gary. “We’ve been part of a lot of great things, but this is joining a wonderful family that will live on forever. It’s mind-blowing.”

    It’s a fitting tribute to a group that has brought so much to country music and its fans.

    Jay, Joe Don and Gary see their latest album as the perfect representation of all the elements that go into the music that has given them so much success.

    “Everything is in this big crock pot called Changed,” says Gary with a laugh “It’s got meat, potatoes, vegetables—all of it. It’s fun, it’s poignant, and we think the hard work that went into has really paid off. And we’re very glad to take one more big step down the road.”

    Biography from official Rascalflatts.

     

     

Carrie Underwood-Country Music Weekly-music news

Granger Smith – Backroad Song “country music weekly”

Bio From Official Granger Smith website.http://www.grangersmith.com/about

My name is Granger Smith. Sometimes long, fancy industry bios are helpful, but other times you just need to hear from the guy actually living it, so here’s my story.

I was born and raised Texan, and I’m proud of that. I grew up along with two brothers, a couple of yellow labrador retrievers and parents that stayed together because they loved each other. My life changed when I was 14 years old and decided I would teach myself to play guitar. This was motivated by two things: I thought the guitar would make girls pay attention to me, and George Strait played one. By the time I turned 15, I was performing weekends on small town stages in North Texas, and doing my best as a fan club member to attend every George Strait concert within driving distance. Playing high school football was an important rite of passage for me, along with hunting and fishing, but the dream of a music career consumed me. At age 19, I was satisfied with enough songs I had written to make an album. As a freshman at Texas A&M, I was able to scrape together some studio money by pre-selling the album to friends around campus. For being just a kid, that album did pretty well. It landed me a songwriting deal with EMI Music Publishing in Nashville, and the following year, I took the leap to Tennessee.

My time in Nashville was important. I absorbed the craft of songwriting from some of the best, learned my way around studios and recording gear, (which paid off for me later) and cut my teeth on countless stages as both a singer and as a steel guitar player for other singers. After four years, I had a shelf full of song demos, a little bit of music business know-how and a strong conviction to move back to Texas, finish my degree at Texas A&M, and start a band.

Moving back to College Station meant basically starting over. The gigs were hard to book and when they did, nobody showed up to watch. But I was happy and felt creative. I saved money by making albums out of my house and using my band. We wore out vehicles and went from two pickup trucks, to a suburban, to a van and then another van. The trailers we towed got bigger, and ever so slowly, so did our crowds. I learned how to use a camera and some editing software for making homemade music videos and we made lots of them.

My little brother, Tyler joined me in 2008. He traded a pretty good job at the bank to jump in an old van and sell t-shirts in honky-tonk dive bars. I think he did it not only because he shared the same vision as me, but also because his competitive nature was excited about proving a bunch of people wrong. And that’s exactly what we did. Together we conspired and worked from the ground up with the goal of not only building an artist, but a brand. We embraced social media, searched for real connections with fans, studied our predecessors and ignored our doubters. The good shows helped pay for all the bad ones, and the songs that sold helped fund all the others that didn’t. We put communities first, knowing that without the people, we were without a job.

We created alter-egos through videos to help promote the music and that’s where Earl Dibbles Jr. came from in the summer of 2011. It started as a short, funny video that my brothers and I filmed out where my parents live in Central Texas, but it turned out to be something that completely changed the shape of my career. I actually like to think of it as an “intentional accident” because as planned, the video went viral and became a huge promotional tool for my music. But we had no way to know if it would actually work, especially since many of my videos before it never caught fire.

In the early morning of April 16, 2013, I woke up and checked the iTunes store on my phone with tired eyes. I was absolutely shocked to see my new album, Dirt Road Driveway sitting at #1. Things were rapidly changing on the road, too. We were seeing sold out shows in markets we had never played, and a passion in fans unlike anything I had seen before. After independently releasing 7 studio albums, 1 live album and 2 EPs, I finally signed my first record deal in 2015. I met some great people at Broken Bow Music Group (BBR Music Group) in Nashville who sought us out, believed in my dedication and wanted to take what I was already doing, and magnify the message. We worked together not only as colleagues, but as friends unified on the same mission. Within only weeks of the signing, my debut single “Backroad Song” was a hit at mainstream country radio faster than any of us expected.

A few years ago, I was standing with my boots in red, sandy, Iraqi soil watching a beautifully majestic Middle Eastern sunset, when one of my band members asked me, “Can you believe music got us here?” No, I can’t. What a journey it has been since I decided to chase this crazy dream. We’ve played 10 countries, 3 continents, even the White House a few times, and I still can’t believe it all started with a few guitar chords. In my song called “Sleeping On The Interstate,” I wrote, “Connecting map dots like poets and prisoners, trying to live more like a lover than sinner, slave to dreams so far away.” That’s me. If there’s one thing I’ve learned from the music business, it’s that you don’t really choose this life, you are this life. That’s the truth no matter if you’re selling albums or not. I do what I love and love what I do, and there’s no sweeter freedom than that.

 

FarmBorough Festival Canceled Country Music News

d1ac59a78fc8da7d788dd454efb1194bFarmBorough, music festival set for June 17th through 19th, has been canceled. This was to be the second year for the event, which launched in June 2015 at New York’s Randall’s Island Park. Jason Aldean, Tim McGraw and Toby Keith were tapped as headliners

A message on FarmBorough’s site explains the cancellation.

“FarmBorough Festival will not return to Randall’s Island in June of 2016. All of us at FarmBorough Festival appreciate the support we have received, but conditions dictate that we redirect our energy at this time,” reads the statement. “We appreciate the opportunity you afforded us to present FarmBorough in New York City, and apologize for any inconvenience.”

Refunds for the festival, along with pre-purchased ferry passes to reach Randall’s Island, will be available.

While the specific reason for the festival’s demise is unknown, it doesn’t appear to be any lingering physical issue with the venue: the rock and pop Governors Ball Music Festival is set for the same site June 3rd through 5th.

FarmBorough is just the latest country music gathering to be canceled. The Big Barrel Country Music Festival, scheduled for June in Delaware, was called off last month. It too was entering its second year.

By

country music weekly chats with Matt Austin country music news

matt austin

Hello Matt Austin, Before we get into all the amazing things you have going on right now, let’s start from the beginning!  you grew up in Detroit, Michigan , can you tell us what growing up there was like for you as a kid and was music a strong influence in your family? How did you come upon your interest to be a musician?

Well, I grew up in the Metro Detroit area, in a city called Woodhaven that is about 20 minutes south of Detroit.  It was cool growing up there,  it wasn’t a big city, but it wasn’t rural either and if you wanted find the country roads, we didn’t have to go very far. 

Music was a strong influence in my family.  My Dad played guitar as a hobby and really loved music.  My mom was the singer though.  My Dad gave singing a good effort but it was my mom that had the voice. 

Then my Uncle Gary moved in with us when I was 9 years old and he showed me this Stevie Ray Vaughan album, “Texas Flood,” and I was hooked, by the sounds and asked my parents for a guitar for Christmas. 

They got me one that Christmas and everything started when I was 10 years old!

2)  You have a fascinating list of musicians that have influenced your path in music. Artists like Stevie Ray Vaughan, Lynard Skynard, Eric Clapton and Jimi Hendrix. Such a variety of styles of music! you can definitely hear the rock roots in your music , what was it about these artists that captivated your interest to follow their direction in music?

I have to give credit here to my Dad again.  We would rock out these artists when I was growing up.  I think Country Music now has a lot of these influences in it today!

I will also add to that and say with such an influence of these Rock Icons in your music , it’s no wonder you have such a rich, solid sound that is all your own!

3) What some people may not know is that your actually the frontman for a rock band The Paper Street Saints in your early performing years,  opening in Detroit area for such heavyweight acts such as Bon Jovi , Def Leppard, Styx and Tesla! those are some pretty great bands to share the stage with! What was it like to perform with these artists? you must have some memorable moments to share with us of those times.

Well, I wasn’t the front man in this band.  I was the lead guitar player and I sang backing vocals.  It wasn’t until after I left this band that I started to develop my own solo career as an artist.

When I opened for Bon Jovi it was at The Palace in Auburn Hills MI with Paper Street Saints and it was incredible to look out to 20,000 fans while we were playing.  My Dad roadied for us when we were eating in the catering room, I nearly spilled my drink all over the table when Bon Jovi walked in the room. 

When I opened for Def Leppard and Styx I was with the Matt Austin Band and this was at DTE Energy Music Theatre, formally know as Pine Knob.

This was another incredible moment for me to step on that stage to perform.  My Dad used to take me to concerts here and I always wanted to perform on that stage!

4) It’s hard to imagine a hard rocker as you listen to your current playlist today, what were you doing the day the emerging new country sound caught your ear and you made the decision to turn the dial to country? This direction has proven to be highly successful transition for Canadian Country artist Dallas Smith, who has found tremendous success as a country artist .

I actually had taken a little break from the music business and was going to college for a Nursing Degree and my wife had seen Brantley Gilbert’s music video on CMT.  She woke me up and told me that she thought I would be good at this type of music.  I started posting some covers of me and an acoustic on YouTube and ended up getting a better response than I had ever had and it felt more natural to me than anything I’ve ever done. 

5)  Your music reflects feel good lyrics and catchy – crank up the volume – and thinking of your favorite memory kind of songs, are these drawn from your own personal experiences? what do you like to do when your not performing?

Some of my songs that I’ve written do reflect on my own personal experiences, and some of my songs are from songwriters out of Nashville.

It’s all about the song for me.

I was an athlete before I got in to music, so I love to try and keep my youth and stay in shape by working out, and playing basketball.  I love to watch football and movies as well.

6) How does a lyric typically trigger an idea for a song? Where does the inspiration usually hit you?

There is really no specific answer for this.  Song lyrics and inspirations have come from all different angles.  It could be something I see on a TV show or a movie, or something a friend is doing or dealing with, or something in my life. 

7) What can you tell any new listeners what to expect from one of your shows? From what I see you are definitely in your element onstage , the energy from you and your band is very infectious and the fans are truly having a great time!

Haha.  Yup.  You pretty much explained it all in a nut shell there.  It’s hard to explain, but when we get on the stage we lay it all out on the table.  There is definitely an energy in the room and the crowd can feel it too!

We just want everyone to feel good and have a great time while we are performing.  More than just being a good singer, and have great songs, being able to perform and entertain is a key element to all of this!

8)Tell us some of the great Country acts you have worked with or shared the stage with in the past or upcoming shows

We have been super fortunate over the last couple of years to be able to share the stage with Lee Brice, Sam Hunt, Chase Rice, Brantley Gilbert and many more, including performing at some of the largest country music festivals with artist’s like Cole Swindell, Parmalee, Florida Georgia Line, Luke Bryan and more!

We are currently working on tour dates for 2016 to support the our sophomore single at national country radio.  Hopefully fans will be able to catch us out on the road with one of these artist’s!

9) What is your favorite song to perform live at your concerts? one of my favorites is Cold One Tonight, such a great tune! but your whole playlist is fantastic!

Awe thanks so much!  Ya, that’s a fun one!  It’s funny because when we perform that song, even people who haven’t heard it before are singing the tag line by the end of it.  I’m not sure if I have a favorite one though.  I love them all in a different way.

10) You had a pretty exciting 2015 with your recent signing with Arrow Entertainment of Nashville/Seattle and a new EP being released, what were some other highlights of the year for you

2015 we have ended with a bang.  We released our debut single, “Summer I’ll Always Remember,’ to country radio and it just hit #9 on the New Music Weekly Country Main Chart and close to 60 radio stations across the country have added it to rotation.  We are super excited to release our next single, “Bad Feelin,” to country radio in January!

11) Your brand new EP “The Island presale is now going on with some cool insentives when you purchase , Tell us a little more about that and when the album officially becomes available  in digital stores,

Ya, this is pretty cool.  So the pre-release is available now on iTunes and Google Play for just $3.99 and you will get 3 songs instantly.  The EP then comes out on Christmas Day, and you will get the remaining 4 songs automatically on Christmas Day!  The first 250 people to get the presale and post a screen shot on social media with the hash tag #TheIslandEP get an autographed copy of my debut self-titled EP and they are entered for a chance to win a personal skype acoustic performance from me! 

12)  From The Island album has already released two great singles, ” The Island” and “Summer I’ll always Remember” give us a hint of what we will find when listening to the rest of the album?

For me, the hardest thing to do with this album was to pick which songs we would release as singles.  Honestly, they are all so good.  If you like the singles we release from it, don’t be surprised if you like the other songs on the EP even better.  They literally could all be singles. 

Well thanks Matt for taking the time to chat with us! We wish you and your family a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year from us here at Country Music Weekly!

Matt Austin Photo

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Thank you so much for chatting with me!  We wish you and all your families at Country Music Weekly a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year as well!  

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Check out bad feeling by matt austin

country music news,Brothers Osborne – Stay A Little Longer

Brother Osborne photo

Years before they climbed the country charts with songs like “Stay a Little Longer” and “Rum,” the Brothers Osborne grew up in Deale, Maryland, a small fishing town on the Atlantic seaboard. It was a cozy place, filled with blue-collar workers who made their living on the water. During the weekends, many of those workers would head over to the Osborne household, where a series of loose, all-night jam sessions filled the Maryland air with the sounds of Bob Seger, Hank Williams, Tom Petty and George Jones.

The Osborne siblings strummed their first chords during those jam sessions. From the very start, TJ Osborne was the brother with the voice. He sang in a thick, low baritone, crooning like Johnny Cash long before he was even old enough to drive. Older brother John, on the other hand, was the family’s guitar shredder, his fingers capable of down-home bluegrass licks, arena-worthy rock riffs, country twang, and everything in between. Combined, the two Osbornes could play everything from traditional country music to rock & roll, creating a broad, full-bodied sound that would eventually fill the 11 songs on their major-label debut, Pawn Shop.

Like its title suggests, Pawn Shop offers a little bit of everything. There’s bluesy slide guitar, country duets, southern rock solos, harmonies, and plenty of groove. The hooks are big, the guitars are loud, and the songs — every last one of them co-written by the Osbornes, who reached out to award-winning songwriters like Shane McAnally and Ross Copperman for help — introduce a duo whose music bridges the gap between the mainstream and the alternative world. Some songs were written at home in Nashville, while others came together on the road, where the guys spent several years headlining their own club shows, touring the country with Darius Rucker, and playing some of the biggest arenas in America with fellow rule-breaker Eric Church.

“Most duos are built on singing,” says TJ “But John is an incredible guitar player, and this band is built on me singing and John playing guitar. It gives us two parallels that work nicely together.”

“It’s like an old-school rock approach,” adds John, who cites classic bands like Aerosmith and the Allman Brothers as influences on the duo’s dynamic. “Groups like that always had the lead singer as well as the sideman guitar player. That’s what we’re going for, too. We’re carving our own path in country music.”

That unique path has already led the band toward the upper half of the country charts. “Rum” got them there first, mixing the feel-good sunshine of a beach tune with a far more realistic storyline. There’s no actual beach in “Rum,” after all. Instead, Brothers Osborne turn the song into a tribute to the simple pleasures that their Maryland hometown offers: friends, good weather, and the occasional drink. They even filmed the song’s music video in Deale, filling the clip with footage of friends, relatives, and locals.

“Most people we grew up with don’t go to these beautiful beaches,” says TJ. “They can’t afford to do it. They don’t have the time for it. What we’re most familiar with is people going to the local bars and hanging out with each other.” John adds, “We tried to have the biggest time possible with what little we had. ‘Rum’ explains that.” The brothers agree, “We had to say it from our own perspective.”

A similar theme runs throughout “Dirt Rich” and “Pawn Shop,” two songs that stress the importance of appreciating what you’ve got. Pawn Shop dishes up plenty of love songs, too, from “Loving Me Back” — an old-school country duet featuring vocals from Lee Ann Womack — to “Stay a Little Longer,” the band’s biggest hit to date. While a three-minute guitar solo brings “Stay a Little Longer” to an epic, anthemic close, Brothers Osborne also devote time to more laid-back songs, from the nostalgic California country of “21 Summer” to the 420-friendly “Greener Pastures.”

Brothers Osborne, who co-produced the album with Jay Joyce (the award-winning producer behind Little Big Town’s Painkiller, Eric Church’s The Outsiders, and Carrie Underwood’s Storyteller), recorded most of Pawn Shop during breaks in their busy touring schedule, using members of their own touring band rather than session musicians from the Nashville community. The result is an album that’s stamped with the unmistakable mark of a band. It doesn’t sound like two singers, flanked by anonymous players. Instead, it sounds like a group of road warriors who’ve spent years sharing bus seats and hotel rooms, creating the sort of chemistry that can’t be faked. Pawn Shop is both raw and real, and Brothers Osborne — who, years after those household jam sessions in Deale, now have a handful of nationwide tours under their belts, songs on the charts, and a career on the rise — are no longer a family secret.

Country Music News

http://www.brothersosborne.com/bio/

 

country news Thomas Rhett still holding the number one spot on the Billboards Country charts.

Country Music News

Thomas Rhett is staying on top of the charts with “Die a happy man” This is a fantastic easy listening country song that just feels good.  Its great to see such a nice song ruling the top of the charts. Country needs a few more songs like this, and a few less whiskey drinking lets get drunk songs, not that we do not need those from time to time of course:)   Everybody loves a good easy going song from time to time, whether they will admit it or not. Die a happy man for sure delivers that good old country feeling.

Check out the Billboard country charts below.

http://www.billboard.com/charts/country-songs

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Thomas Rhett photo

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