She Used to Love Me a Lot (The JC/EC Version)

By Johnny Cash

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Fender Telecaster – History and Actuality

If you happen to be searching the Internet, wading your way through useless information just to get essential info about which guitar you should chose, your search is over.  We happen to know which guitar you should specifically choose.  We can save you the trouble and headache of searching for it elsewhere.  If you’re looking for the best guitar available in the market, than The Fender Telecaster is perfect for you.  We have all the necessary information that you need to know about the Telecaster.  Not only that, you also discuss to you a brief historical background of this guitar, the popular guitar players who plays this model, and a little something about its specifications.  So, if you’re interested in knowing something about the best guitar in the world, (in our opinion, and perhaps the world’s opinion) we urge you to read further, because we believe that we have all the necessary things that you need to know.

The history of The Fender Telecaster.

The Fender Telecaster is probably one of the world’s most recognizable electric guitars.  It has the most simple but noticeable design that guitar players favor a lot.  It has been in the market for over 50 years and is still going strong.  Matter of fact, it is the first solid body guitar that was produced.  It provided inspiration for some of the most popular and recognizable music of the 20th century up until today.  Music like blues, RNB, rock, jazz and country music are all played on Telecasters.

The Telecaster was accidentally created by Leo fender while he was experimenting with guitar amplification.  He created a crude solid body guitar model just to test his early pickup designs.  When he tried playing it, he noticed that the solid body prototype produce the tone that was remarkably outstanding.  Eventually, local musicians from all over the place noticed the potential of the guitar and that encouraged him to create a solid body electric guitar.  Thus, The Fender Telecaster was born.

It was initially named esquire and then it was changed to broadcaster.  But because of the claim that the Gretsch Company made about it being a trademark violation because it was too similar with regard to their broadcaster drums.  So in 1952 the first commercial versions of these Telecasters were released.  Until now, the Telecasters are still the longest running solid body electric guitar that is still in production.

The Fender Telecaster has a noticeably bright piercing tone that cuts through almost any frequency range.  That is why the unique sound that is easily recognizable by guitar players and fanatics of fender Telecasters are favored by legendary guitar players such as: Eric Clapton, jimmy page, Keith Richards, Jeff beck, Danny Gatton, Steve cropper, book Owens, and James Burton.  Today, The Fender Telecaster has branched out many different models.  Some of this is the American Standard, Telecaster deluxe, Telecaster junior, Telecaster plus, Telecaster Thinline, and not to mention the numerous Telecaster signature models series.  Amongst these models, vintage Telecasters are the most expensive ones.  But you could also choose the cheaper ones which is also good.



Source by Michael Corleone

When You Leave That Way You Can Never Go Back (Remastered Album Version)

By Confederate Railroad

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Don’t You Think It’s Come Our Time (with June Carter Cash)

By Johnny Cash

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What is a Nervous Breakdown and How Do You Fix It


We’ve all heard the expression, “nervous breakdown”, but what does that mean, exactly?

First off, what makes people think they are having a nervous breakdown? Is it the moment they feel they have lost all ability to cope with their lives and all the stresses that come with it?

What are the symptoms they are experiencing at that time? Probably the most prominent is their minds are spinning. They can’t get a grip on any one thought because they all blend together as one chaotic mess. It’s impossible to think straight, to sort things out. They might also have lost their energy and are unable to get up in the morning and complete their daily tasks. They can’t cope with the simplest concept.

In short, they think they are going mad. After all, isn’t madness the inability to care for yourself because your mind has gone awry? It’s a terrifying concept, to be sure. But does a person really go mad?

We’ve seen the stereotypical images in movies of people wandering the halls read on ..
http://rockstarseo.ca/what-is-a-nervous-breakdown-and-how-do-you-fix-it/

The History of St. Louis Imperial Swing Dancing

There are a total of eight swing dance clubs located in and around the St. Louis area (including M.U.S.I.C. in Collinsville, Illinois) that are members of the Midwest Swing Dance Federation, and all of these clubs are descended from the St. Louis Imperial Dance Club that was founded in 1973. The largest of these sister clubs, the West County Swing Dance Club, has the distinction of being one of the largest swing clubs in the United States with an active membership that totals more than a thousand dancers.

Imperial Swing got its name from the Club Imperial located at Goodfellow Boulevard and West Florissant Avenue. The building, originally called Imperial Hall, was built in 1928 as a dance hall, bowling alley and restaurant/bar complex. In the 1930s and 1940s, it was the dance spot of Northwest St. Louis, just as Arcadia (later called Tune Town), the Admiral Showboat in Midtown, and the Casa Loma on the Southside, were the most popular dance halls in their respective areas. In 1952, George Edick Enterprises purchased Imperial Hall and George Edick renamed it the Club Imperial. During the early part of that decade, he operated the club as a ballroom with the theme of “a nice place for nice people.” He played “big band” music and catered primarily to private parties. He was able to regularly book guest appearances with popular performers like Stan Kenton and Louis Prima because Robert Hyland, of CBS and KMOX radio, broadcast his weekly “Coast To Coast with Bob Hyland” program from the Imperial Ballroom.

During the late 1950s and early 1960s, Edick realized that the country’s taste in music had shifted to “Rock ‘n Roll” and he used his advertising-public relations firm, to aggressively promote the Club Imperial on KWK, KXOK, WIL and WGNU. The Joe Bozzi Quintet, Jimmie (Night Train) Forrest, Chuck Berry, Dolly Parton, the Monkeys, Glen Campbell, Ike and Tina Turner and a small vocal group now called the “Fifth Dimension” are among the many artists who began their careers at his club. He promoted a “Jitterbug” contest where a couple from the Club Imperial (Teddy Cole and Kathy Burke) won the National Jitterbug Championship. During the “Rock ‘n Roll” craze, Edick held Tuesday “Teen Night” dances, and it was during these weekly dances that a jitterbug variation that became known as the “Imperial Style” of St. Louis swing was born. As the 60s progressed, music trends were changing again. The ‘roll’ started dropping out of “Rock ‘n Roll,” the ‘rock’ got harder, and the teenagers increasingly attended loud, psychedelic music concerts. Because the freak-out beats of their acid rock music was almost impossible to dance to, Edick gradually discontinued all public dances at his club.

In the 1970s, George Edick wanted to reintroduce more listenable and danceable music at Club Imperial and he found that hosting swing contests was just the ticket! He got together with Teddy Cole, the Jitterbug champion who was also a dance promoter in his own right, and they decided to sponsor a yearly St. Louis Jitterbug Contest “Imperial Style” to pick a “City Champion.” These widely publicized contests prompted many of the older, experienced dancers to come around the club again, and Edick sponsored a number of “Salute Dances” to introduce these old timers to the newer dancers. As more and more people began learning the Imperial, they began organizing into small dance groups that met in apartment complexes around the St. Louis area, and George Edick kept in touch with many of their leaders.

In 1973 Al Morris conceived the idea of forming a club, and it was his group that first met at the San Miguel apartments in St. Charles which became the St. Louis Imperial Dance Club. The founders are: Dave Cheshire, Jan Cheshire, Rick McQueen, Joan Fritz, Debbie Dustman (Wheelis) and Veronica Lynch. The new club alternated their dances between Lynch’s apartment complex in South County and the Wood Hollow apartments in West County. Edick contacted the Board and he told them that he was very interested in helping their club to fulfill their mission to keep swing dancing alive. The great promoter convinced them, with a persuasive new adaptation of his original 1950s theme, that their growing club should hold their future dances at his Club Imperial ballroom because it’s “a nice place for nice people who like to swing dance!”

Good mottos never die but unfortunately people do, and on June 11, 2002 George Edick passed away. The building is silent now but it stands, not only as a landmark where Imperial Swing all began, but also as a tribute to a man who, over his colorful, eighty-six-year lifetime, was able to convert his dreams into reality . . . not a bad epitaph!



Source by Skip Culver

Born to Be Your Woman

By Joey + Rory

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